Tag: search engines

Database search: how to use search terms?

Each database has its own specific method to make the contents of that database accessible and consultable. Most databases use "Basic search" and "Advanced search". Via "Basic search" you can filter the search results after performing a search. "Advanced search" allows you to choose more specific search criteria before performing ...    Read more

Embase: comparison with PubMed and tips & tricks for searching

Embase is regarded as the European equivalent of PubMed/MEDLINE. When using the Embase search engine, you automatically browse not only the Embase database but also articles in PubMed/MEDLINE that have already been assigned MeSH terms. Access Embase is only accessible via the UGent network. Search operators Embase can be ...    Read more

EndNote: how can you import references?

You can import references into EndNote from many different databases. In the clips below, we explain how to import references from the four most commonly used ones: the library's catalogue, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Library catalogue: lib.ugent.be (You might need to log in to your Microsoft Stream ...    Read more

GISMO: Research Explorer

GISMO is the Ghent University research information system. This system supports two aims: (1) database of all research related information (researchers with their career details and expertise, projects, publications and other types of output, research activities, equipment etc.) and (2) support/streamlining research related workflows (application and management of research proposals, ...    Read more

Google Scholar

Google Scholar is the scientific counterpart of Google. You can search for books, (peer reviewed) articles, reports, conference papers, and so on. You can narrow down your list of results by selecting a time period and/or language in the left-hand column. Note that Google Scholar does not check the quality ...    Read more

Google: search tips

Google is a powerful search engine. But the results list can be endlessly long and at page 3 you still haven't found what you were looking for. These tips and tricks will help you specify a better search question. Use unique, specific terms (keywords, not sentences). E.g. search for "headache" ...    Read more

Search: Boolean operators

The 3 most important Boolean operators that can be used to search on the internet are AND, OR and NOT. These operators are used as conjunctions to combine or exclude search terms in a search, resulting in more focused and productive results. The use of these operators can significantly ...    Read more

Searching: what is a citation search?

A citation search can go forward or backward in time. If you go forward in time, you look for the sources cited by your original article. If you go back in time, you look for the sources that cited your original article. Benefits Citation searches can help you find more ...    Read more

Web of Science: what is My Research Assistant (app) and how do I use it?

Web of Science (Clarivate) developed a new app to help you access their database from wherever you are. But what can you do with it exactly, and how can you start using it? What can you do with it? The app allows you to access Web of Science, save search ...    Read more