Tag: quality assessment

Altmetrics: the basics

Altmetrics are non-traditional, quantitative indicators as an alternative to more traditional indicators such as the Journal Impact Factor and the H-Index. Some examples of altmetrics are number of downloads of your publication number of mentions on twitter number of times your publication was added to an online reference manager such ...    Read more

Article submission for publication

How do you get your article published in a journal? How do you choose the right journal? The Knowledge Center for Health Ghent (KCGG) lists several tips on getting published for the medical sciences. Here's a selection of generally applicable tips. How do you select a journal? CriterionTools Content Manuscript ...    Read more

Assess the quality of a scholarly journal

Researchers can choose from tens of thousands of scholarly journals to disseminate their research results.  It is not always easy to find out which ones are reliable. General guidelines Think. Check. Submit is a checklist to help you identify trustworthy journals and publishers. Have (many of) your trusted peers published ...    Read more

Classification A1 / P1: definition and distinction

Definition A1 Articles included in one of the ISI Web of Science indexes 'Science Citation Index', 'Social Science Citation Index' or 'Arts and Humanities Citation Index'. Limited to the publications document type: article, review, letter, note, proceedings paper. When an article is already included in Web of Science, both ...    Read more

Clinical trial: how do I evaluate the quality?

There are various free, internationally accredited and used tools (i.e. scales and checklists) for evaluating the quality of clinical studies. More information is available on the webpages of the Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent (Question: How do I evaluate the quality of a clinical study?).     Read more

Evidence-based guideline: how can I evaluate the quality?

The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation Instrument (AGREE II) is a general tool for authors and users of guidelines to evaluate the methodological quality of clinical guidelines. The AGREE II tool is available in different languages, including Dutch and English.    Read more

Journal: what does "peer-reviewed" mean?

It is essential to researchers to publish in peer-reviewed journals. A peer review means that the quality of the research will be assessed by colleagues before publication. In practice, peer review works like this: Submit: You send your article to a journal. The subject of your article falls within the ...    Read more

Research integrity: a suspicion of violation– what to do?

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ In most cases, we can determine research behaviour to be good or bad, quite easily. This is a lot less clear for behaviour that doesn’t live ...    Read more

Research integrity: ALLEA code – European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ The ALLEA code The European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity, is better known in the research community as the “ALLEA code”, simply because it was ...    Read more

Research integrity: Commission for Research Integrity

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ There’s no clear-cut definition of research integrity, nor do we have a list of 'does and don’ts' that apply for all researchers, in all research circumstances. ...    Read more

Research Integrity: online training tool Mind the GAP

What and how 'Mind the GAP' is an English-language online training tool for all researchers and all those involved in research, from PhD students to more experienced researchers, to trainers/teachers and policy makers. The focus is on research integrity and the promotion of good research practices in all disciplines. The ...    Read more

Research integrity: reasons to care

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ Why you should care about research integrity Research integrity is part of quality assurance in research. Doing the right thing always improves quality and it is ...    Read more

Research integrity: the slippery slope

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ The continuum from good to bad, over unacceptable Research integrity is part of researchers’ professional responsibility and inherently connected to what we do (or not) in ...    Read more

Research integrity: what is it about?

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/  (Research) Integrity Integrity is about doing the right things doing things right all of this at the right time regardless of whether no one is ...    Read more

Retraction Watch: what is it?

Retraction Watch is a database that lists retracted (retractions) or corrected (corrections) publications, or publications with an expressions of concern. A blog is connected to the databese, highlighting some of the retracted publications. Retraction Watch started in 2010, which means you will not find older publications in the collection. The ...    Read more

Science: how do you spot bad science?

This infographic explains the difference between good science and bad (pseudo) science. Read more here.    Read more

Systematic review: tips & tricks and tools

How do I formulate my research question and how do I formulate selection criteria? Formulate a research question in which, if possible, all aspects of your topic are named. The PICO model is a tool for setting up a clinical research question. In this model the patient category (Population/Patient), ...    Read more