Tag: quality assessment

Article submission for publication

How do you get your article published in a journal? How do you choose the right journal?

The Knowledge Center for Health Ghent (KCGG) lists several tips on getting published for the medical sciences. Here's a selection of generally applicable tips.

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Assess the quality of a scholarly journal

Researchers can choose from tens of thousands of scholarly journals to disseminate their research results.  It is not always easy to find out which ones are reliable.

General guidelines
  • Think. Check. Submit is a checklist to help you identify trustworthy journals and publishers.
  • Have (many of) your trusted peers published …
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Critical reading: the CRAAP test

You want to base your academic, scientific research on scientifically sound sources. Often, the publisher already gives you an insight into how reliable the source is; publishers of A1-journals, for instance, already peer-review their articles. Academic libraries collect scientific literature, etc.
However, you can also find many interesting sources on …

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Evidence-based guideline: how can I evaluate the quality?

The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation Instrument (AGREE II) is a general tool for authors and users of guidelines to evaluate the methodological quality of clinical guidelines. The AGREE II tool is available in different languages, including Dutch and English.

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Journal: what does "peer-reviewed" mean?

It is essential to researchers to publish in peer-reviewed journals. A peer review means that the quality of the research will be assessed by colleagues (usually before publication). Some monograph publishers also work with peer review, which means that the quality of the books they publish has been assessed by …

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Peer review: what is it?

Peer review (sometimes also called ‘expert review’ or ‘merit review) implies that colleagues (‘peers’) assess the research of other scholars, groups of scholars or entire institutions. Peer review is considered an effective way of safeguarding the quality of research. All researchers are involved in peer review: as the person to …

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Research assessment: altmetrics

Altmetrics are non-traditional, quantitative indicators as an alternative to more traditional indicators such as the Journal Impact Factor and the H-Index. Some examples of altmetrics are

  • number of downloads of your publication
  • number of mentions on twitter
  • number of times your publication was added to an online reference manager such …
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Research assessment: responsible use of indicators

Quantitative indicators can support the evaluation of research performance. However, they should be used with caution because scientific practice is too complex to be grasped in one indicator. Quantitative indicators are therefore preferably used together with qualitative information about the research.

The Research Department of Ghent University compiled a guideline …

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Research assessment: what is DORA?

The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) is a global initiative intended to guide the way in which research is assessed at the point of recruitment and promotion and in the awarding of project funding. Since 2012, all actors involved in the evaluation of research can sign up to …

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Research integrity training: 7 knowledge clips

The knowledge clips on training research integrity: a series of 7 clips 

In total there are 7 knowledge clips available on training research integrity. They are all in English.

Knowledge clip 1 - presentation: the basics

Knowledge clip 2 - presentation: the trainer's perspective

Knowledge clip 3 - exercise: the …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 1: the basics

Knowledge clip 1: the basics 

Knowledge clip 1 is a general and rather theoretical introduction about what research integrity is, and why it is important, incl. all the technical jargon. Using the ALLEA code, it is explained how researchers can behave in an integer way and what kind of behaviour …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 2: the trainer perspective

Knowledge clip 2: the trainer perspective 

In order to make a successful training module, stand-alone or as part of another course, there are some terms and conditions you as a teacher/trainer need to consider, in terms of the design, the content of the training and the characteristics of the trainer. This …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 3: the good researcher

Knowledge clip 3: the good researcher  

In the exercise ‘the good researcher’ the trainees identify the characteristics of a good researcher. They are stimulated to explore the different meanings of ‘goodness’, and to reflect on similarities and differences between researchers and research disciplines. As a trainer, you can link the …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 4: the lab

Knowledge clip 4: the lab

This clip contains the exercise “The lab – who and what“. The movie and roleplay “The lab” was produced by the American Office of Research Integrity, ORI. In the exercise ‘the lab’ the trainees identify what is at stake (or at risk) in the event …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 5: the dilemma game

Knowledge clip 5: the dilemma game

The Dilemma Game has been developed by Erasmus University Rotterdam to stimulate awareness of research integrity. The game wants to make trainees reflect on a particular case, a so-called dilemma. They should consider how to act in an integer way whenever they are confronted with …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 6: the middle position

Knowledge clip 6: the middle position

One of the most interesting and meaningful things to do in a research integrity training is to analyse a real-life case. That is: the description of a situation in which researchers are being challenged to act according to the values and norms of research …

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Research integrity training: knowledge clip 7: closure

Knowledge clip 7: closure

This clip gives some inspiration on how to close or wrap up a workshop or class on research integrity.

It is advisable to watch clip 1 and clip 2 first.

 

 

Content links from the clip

The tool often refers to additional interpretation or material …

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Research integrity: a suspicion of violation– what to do?

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

In most cases, we can determine research behaviour to be good or bad, quite easily. This is a lot less clear for behaviour that doesn’t live …

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Research integrity: ALLEA code – European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

The ALLEA code

The European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity, is better known in the research community as the “ALLEA code”, simply because it was …

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Research integrity: Commission for Research Integrity

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

There’s no clear-cut definition of research integrity, nor do we have a list of 'does and don’ts' that apply for all researchers, in all research circumstances. …

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Research Integrity: online training tool Mind the GAP

What and how

'Mind the GAP' is an English-language online training tool for all researchers and all those involved in research, from PhD students to more experienced researchers, to trainers/teachers and policy makers. The focus is on research integrity and the promotion of good research practices in all disciplines.

The …

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Research integrity: reasons to care

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Why you should care about research integrity

Research integrity is part of quality assurance in research. Doing the right thing always improves quality and it is …

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Research integrity: the slippery slope

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

The continuum from good to bad, over unacceptable

Research integrity is part of researchers’ professional responsibility and inherently connected to what we do (or not) in …

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Research integrity: what is it about?

You can use slides and information from this research tip, taking into account the conditions as set out in following Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ 

(Research) Integrity

Integrity is about

  • doing the right things
  • doing things right
  • all of this at the right time
  • regardless of whether no one is …
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Retraction Watch: what is it?

Retraction Watch is a database that lists retracted (retractions) or corrected (corrections) publications, or publications with an expressions of concern. A blog is connected to the databese, highlighting some of the retracted publications. Retraction Watch started in 2010, which means you will not find older publications in the collection. The …

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Science: how do you spot bad science?

This infographic explains the difference between good science and bad (pseudo) science. Read more here.

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