Tag: academic writing

Academic writing in a nutshell

Throughout your career as a student and/or researcher you will produce a series of reports, papers, publications and other texts, in many cases in fluent English. Tips and tricks to improve your writings in English are collected on the UGent portal. The faculty of Arts & Philosophy created a ...    Read more

Endnote: find and remove duplicates

You can find duplicates of references when you click References > Find Duplicates. You will get a pop-up where you can compare possible duplicates. If there are fields that differ, they will be lit up in red. You can choose to keep one ('Keep this reference') or both references (Skip).    Read more

EndNote: how do you make a group?

You can make groups in EndNote to structure your citations. There are three different groups: a Group: you can add citations manually a Smart Group: citations are added automatically a Group Set: a cluster of (Smart) groups Group If you want to make a group to which you can add ...    Read more

EndNote: how to import multiple references from Web of Science

You can import up to 500 references at the same time from Web of Science into your EndNote library. To do this, enter your search query and click "Save to EndNote Desktop" You will see a pop-up where you can enter the amount of references you want to import. If ...    Read more

EndNote: how to personalise your reference fields

You can personalise the fields in EndNote in two different ways. Reference types You can choose which reference type is your preferred default, e.g: Journal Article. You can also choose which fields a certain reference type needs. Open EndNote via Athena Click Edit > Preferences, click on the tab "Reference ...    Read more

Open Access to your publications

Open Access refers to the practice of making peer-reviewed scholarly research and literature freely available online to anyone interested. Open means anyone can freely access, use, modify, and share for any purpose, subject, at most, to requirements that preserve provenance and openness. It does not affect authors' freedom to choose ...    Read more

ORCID: what is it?

ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) offers the possibility to attribute openly an identification number to a researcher. An ORCID-ID is globally unique and will continuously refer to the same researcher. Funders (e.g. NIH, HEFCE, ...) and publishers (bijv. Elsevier, American Association for the Advancement of Science, PLOS, EMBO Press, ...    Read more

Paraphrase: how to

You paraphrase when you explain another author’s idea(s) in your own words, often with added context. Extract the gist. For example, one of the main arguments in Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own (1929) is: women have the right to education. When you paraphrase this, you might write ...    Read more

Resources: search and find information

Do you need to write a text or do you need to find information and you are looking for the right resources? Step 1: define your subject Narrow down your subject on the basis of literature on the subject. Explore the subject. You can read a paper of your teacher/promotor, ...    Read more

Retraction Watch: what is it?

Having your publication retracted is something most authors would like to avoid. There are many different reasons why a publication can be retracted, such as (but not restricted to): Plagiarism of data, images, and/or authorship Self-plagiarism Errors in data, image, analyses, ... Falsification/fabrication of data, results, ... Ethical objections ... ...    Read more

Write: do you know what you are writing?

Before you start writing, having a good sense of what you will be writing is an important first step. Some examples of text types that require different kinds of writing are: a paper: you look for the answer to an objective research question through field research or a literature ...    Read more